WELCOME TO ARCH(E)WILD

We restore, design, and build ecological landscapes. We focus on plants and plant communities. We understand soil, water, light, topology, and climate. We study plant behavior in the wild, research plant propagation success factors, and perfect planting survival strategies. We use that knowledge in our designs and installations.

  • Urban farming helps feed the world

    Urban farming helps feed the world http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-30182326 Posted from the field by Mark

    Posted at November 30, 2014 | By : | Categories : News | 0 Comment
  • Please Share your Eco-Friendly Lawn Thoughts

    Please Share your Eco-Friendly Lawn Thoughts We at ArcheWild know little about turf grass but we do know a lot about plants and soil.  A customer recently asked, "I was just wondering whether you are able, at this time, to give me any advice as to what I should do for my lawn as far as feeding it or treating it together with timings?"  This customer does not want to use traditional chemicals or services and ...

    Posted at February 14, 2015 | By : | Categories : ArcheWild Services | 1 Comment
  • Cicero Swamp Wildlife Management Area

    http://www.nativetreesociety.org/fieldtrips/new_york/cicero/cicero_swamp_wildlife_management.htm Posted from the field by Mark

    Posted at November 20, 2014 | By : | Categories : Trip Reports | 0 Comment
  • PDA Program Detail – Spotted Lanternfly

    http://www.agriculture.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/gateway/PTARGS_0_2_24476_10297_0_43/AgWebsite/ProgramDetail.aspx?name=SPOTTED-LANTERNFLY&navid=12&parentnavid=0&palid=150& Posted from the field by Mark

    Posted at November 5, 2014 | By : | Categories : Diseases and Pests | 0 Comment
  • Salamanders are an abundant food source in forest ecosystems

    Salamanders are an abundant food source in forest ecosystems In the 1970s, ecologists published results from one of the first whole-forest ecosystem studies ever conducted in Hubbard Brook, New Hampshire. In the paper, scientists reported that salamanders represent one of the largest sources of biomass, or food, of all vertebrates in the forest landscape. Now, using new sampling and statistical techniques not available during the past study, researchers at the University of ...

    Posted at November 28, 2014 | By : | Categories : Ecology | 0 Comment
  • Identification Guide for Photinia floribunda, Photinia pyrifolia, and Photinia melanocarpa

    Identification Guide for Photinia floribunda Photinia floribunda is an elusive chokeberry species that is currently conspicuously absent from the native plant nursery trade partly because it is so difficult to find. Photinia floribunda (purple chokeberry) is a gorgeous native shrub that enjoys moist soils in shade to full sun.  Quite stoloniferous, this species will form fairly large colonies in its ideal soil conditions.  Typically found at slightly higher elevations (500-1000ft) and growing near streams, vernal pools, and ...

    Posted at December 16, 2014 | By : | Categories : Native Plant ID | 1 Comment
  • Plan for bee-friendly roads and rail

    Plan for bee-friendly roads and rail http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/29847474 Posted from the field by Mark

    Posted at November 4, 2014 | By : | Categories : Ecology | 0 Comment
  • American Native Nursery is now ArcheWild Native Nurseries

    American Native Nursery is now ArcheWild Native Nurseries We write to let you know that as of Jan 1, 2015, ArcheWild Native Nurseries will be the new name for American Native Nursery. Please update your records with our new name. Our phone number remains the same: 855-plant-native (855-752-6862) Our main email:   contact@archewild.com Click here for a vCard (downloads from Dropbox) Below you can read in more detail about some of the reasons for the name change.  

    Posted at December 14, 2014 | By : | Categories : News | 0 Comment
  • Cattail Use in the Landscape

    Cattail Use in the Landscape Introduction Historically, the cattail was viewed and used as an everyday source of food and construction materials.  During the last 50-100 years, public opinion soured and cattails were vilified as invasive and destructive; much research was performed both to show that they should be controlled and how they should be controlled.  Today, the value of cattails is being rediscovered as a highly-efficient means of improving water quality, a process called phytoremediation. Cattail ...

    Posted at November 26, 2014 | By : | Categories : Designing with Natives | 0 Comment
  • How to identify Ilex verticillata and Ilex laevigata

    How to identify Ilex verticillata and Ilex laevigata Field guides and websites make differentiation between Ilex verticillata and Ilex laevigata much more difficult than it really is.  Use this handy guide to determine which species you are trying to positively identify. Ilex laevigata Somewhat shiny and medium to light green leaves with blunt tips and blunt teeth on the leaves. Fruit calyx is completely hairless.  Twigs with copious buds and leaf scars. For the botanist: Deciduous shrub to 9 feet ...

    Posted at November 20, 2014 | By : | Categories : Native Plant ID | 2 Comments
  • Native Planting Spacing Calculator

    Native Planting Spacing Calculator Sometimes it gets confusing trying to figure out the number of native plant plugs for a project if we want to use 9" centers or the number of native shrubs if spacing is every 4'. Viola! Attached is a simple EXCEL file, with no macros, that will easily ...

    Posted at February 21, 2015 | By : | Categories : Designing with Natives | 0 Comment
  • Selfie-help for conservation areas

    Selfie-help for conservation areas http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-30435350 Posted from the field by Mark

    Posted at December 11, 2014 | By : | Categories : Uncategorized | 0 Comment
  • Introduction to EcoRegions

    Introduction to EcoRegions Omernik (1987) invented EcoRegion maps and the U.S. EPA modified them to support environmental projects. There are ongoing efforts to refine the maps, primarily by subdividing ecoregions to more accurately reflect field observations. The maps serve as a spatial framework for monitoring ecosystems and ecosystem components.  EcoRegions denote areas within which ecosystems (and the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources) are generally similar. By recognizing the spatial differences in the capacities and potentials of ...

    Posted at December 31, 2014 | By : | Categories : Ecology | 0 Comment
  • Extinction threat to Europe’s bees

    Extinction threat to Europe's bees http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-31963056 Posted from the field by Mark

    Posted at March 19, 2015 | By : | Categories : News | 0 Comment
  • Ecological Detention Basin Design

    Ecological Detention Basin Design Detention basin design needs refreshing.  Let's move beyond  the mown-turf design.  We're tired of looking at these... Instead, lets design our detention basins to function as rich habitat for butterflies, amphibians, dragonflies, birds, and interesting plant species. Below are some simple techniques that engineers and architects can employ to create real functioning habitat without increasing a project's budget. Create Different ...

    Posted at December 8, 2014 | By : | Categories : Ecology | 0 Comment
  • Softened water in the garden good or bad?

    Is watering a new seed lawn and garden with softened water would be good or bad? Q: Softened water in the garden good or bad? A: Neither good nor bad.  Read more below... Most water softener installations include a system bypass for water pipes that lead to outdoor faucets so that you are not using softened water in gardens, etc.  You should be able to see a pipe that ...

    Posted at March 7, 2015 | By : | Categories : News | 0 Comment
  • How wolves saved Yellowstone

    How wolves saved Yellowstone Wolves had been absent from Yellowstone National Park for more than 70 years when they were reintroduced in the 1990s – and their return had some surprising benefits. Wolves were once the top predator in America’s world-famous Yellowstone National Park. But the population was eradicated in the 1920s, leaving the wilderness wolf-free for seven decades. In 1995, however, wolves were reintroduced ...

    Posted at March 25, 2015 | By : | Categories : Ecology | 0 Comment
  • Harvest time for Zanthoxylum americanum (prickly ash)

    Prickly ash is a large shrub to small tree with colorful drupes in late October that turn shiny black in late November.  In its preferred soil, it can form thickets that can function as a natural barrier to human and large mammals due to its large thorns. Prickly ash is in the citrus family so it a host plant for the giant swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes) and other swallowtail species.  Ptelea trifoliata (wafer ash) is another host ...

    Posted at November 9, 2014 | By : | Categories : Designing with Natives | 0 Comment
  • Big City, Big Surprise: New York City’s Newest Species Is a Frog

    Only the second new frog species found in the continental United States in the past 30 years, it remained hidden in plain sight in a city of 8.4 million people. Even in one of the most densely populated places on Earth, nature is still capable of some big surprises. Biologists have described a new species of leopard frog discovered in New York City. "It's a pretty unique event," said Rutgers Universityecologist Jeremy ...

    Posted at November 30, 2014 | By : | Categories : Ecology | 0 Comment
  • Tookany/Tacony-Frankford Watershed Partnership recognizes ArcheWild

    Tookany/Tacony-Frankford Watershed Partnership recognizes ArcheWild Join the Tookany/Tacony-Frankford Watershed Partnership for its Milestones Award Ceremony & Reception on May 13th at their offices at the Globe Dye Works.  To participate, click here. ArcheWild has contributed financially to the organizations efforts to protect and clean the Tookany/Tacony-Frankford watershed.  The watercourse originates in Abington PA and meanders through several heavily-suburbanized areas before it drains into the Delaware River at the Betsy Ross bridge. ArcheWild also supplies plant material for ...

    Posted at February 8, 2015 | By : | Categories : News | 0 Comment
  • ArcheWild Sustainable Nursery Practices

    ArcheWild Sustainable Nursery Practices Many  customers already know that ArcheWild employs the most sustainable nursery practices of any native plant producer on the East Coast.  But for those that are new to the ArcheWild growing program, here are some of the highlights of what we do that makes us so unique: Open Pollinated Species Over 99% of our plant material is grown from open-pollinated local-ecotype (OPLE) seed that we collect or grow ourselves. Other native nurseries rely on cloning techniques ...

    Posted at November 17, 2014 | By : | Categories : News,Nursery Production | 1 Comment
  • Scientists’ greener future vision

    Scientists' greener future vision http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-30277519 Posted from the field by Mark

    Posted at December 4, 2014 | By : | Categories : News | 0 Comment
  • Leaves – The Ultimate Weed Killer

    Leaves - The Ultimate Weed Killer Looking for the best, non-chemical weed killer out there?  Try leaves! Leaving dead leaves in garden beds is often the best technique for keepings weeds away.  Most of our most troublesome weeds are annuals whose seeds require open ground and plenty of sun for them to germinate.  Leaving leaves in the beds covers the ground and prevents access to sunlight for pesky weeds. It can take a couple of years for the ...

    Posted at April 7, 2014 | By : | Categories : Designing with Natives | 0 Comment
  • Africa ‘soil crisis threat’ to future

    Africa 'soil crisis threat' to future http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-30277514 Posted from the field by Mark

    Posted at December 4, 2014 | By : | Categories : News | 0 Comment
  • Harvesting Gleditsia triacanthos (honeylocust) seeds

    Found a nice wild Gleditsia triacanthos tree along the Delaware river tonight.  Collected enough pods for about 500 seeds. Nice chestnut brown pods and great foliage.  A very nice tree for a hedgerow or specimen tree on the edge of a property. Posted from the field by Mark

    Posted at November 11, 2014 | By : | Categories : Seed Collection | 0 Comment
  • Developing Euonymus atropurpurea (Eastern wahoo) Cultivars

    Our chief propagator has been finding and collecting seed from various east coast genotypes of Euonymus atropurpurea for many years.  Genotypes range from West Virginia to Connecticut. See several cultivars are in development below.  The normal Eastern wahoo on the left is a nice saturated pink; many trees have much lighter pink, but the one shown would be considered typical. The middle cultivar in development, Euonymus atropurpurea, is noticeably more saturated ...

    Posted at November 12, 2014 | By : | Categories : Nursery Production | 4 Comments
  • The Dirty Secret of the Future of Native Plant Gardening

    The Dirty Secret of the Future of Native Plant Gardening I haven't the time to write an in-depth post on this important topic, but I'll paste in a short e-mail Q&A I had today that previews what I'll be writing about.   From: Judith Sent: Friday, January 9, 2015 12:52 PM To: contact@archewild.com Subject: Native Aconitum I am writing a Plant Profile for the Greater Trumbauersville Gardener Magazine on the subject of Aconitum. I am wondering, is there a future for Aconitum uncinatum, ...

    Posted at January 9, 2015 | By : | Categories : Designing with Natives | 0 Comment
  • Native Grasses and Flowers of Dauphin County, PA

    Native Grasses and Flowers of Dauphin County, PA The native landscaping design philosophy embraces two key ecological maxims: 1) work with natives that are actually native to the region, and 2) use local genotypes of natives whenever possible.  The USDA maintains an excellent resource for determining if a plant species is or was native to a region.  The list attached here is for native grasses and flowers of Dauphin County, PA.

    Posted at March 17, 2015 | By : | Categories : Designing with Natives | 0 Comment
  • Fungus behind deadly disease in walnut trees mutates easily, complicating control

    Fungus behind deadly disease in walnut trees mutates easily, complicating control Researchers from Purdue and Colorado State universities have discovered that the fungus responsible for thousand cankers disease, a lethal affliction of walnut trees and related species, has a rich genetic diversity that may make the disease more difficult to control. Adjunct assistant professor of forestry Keith Woeste and fellow researchers analyzed the genes of 209 samples of Geosmithia morbida from 17 regions ...

    Posted at November 20, 2014 | By : | Categories : Diseases and Pests | 0 Comment
  • Controlled burning may become an accepted and adopted restoration practice

    Controlled burning may become both an accepted and adopted restoration practice Timely and targeted use of fire to reset the ecological clock for a natural landscape area has been a desire for ecologists for many years. Controlled burning can play a critical role in maintaining certain habitats that were previously prone to lightning-initiated fires or were set intentionally by Native Americans to improve hunting grounds. Fire can suppress or kill invasive species, the heat and smoke ...

    Posted at November 28, 2014 | By : | Categories : Ecology | 0 Comment
UA-49237568-1