Welcome to ArcheWild

ArcheWild is a full-service ecological restoration firm and a local ecotype native plant supplier. ArcheWild provides design and construction services for state and federal agencies as well as large land owners. Our understanding of plant communities and their soil, water, light, and topology requirements virtually guarantees project success. We restore forests, riparian buffers, meadows, and wetlands. We build unique, award-winning all-native landscapes for private customers. Check our current plant inventory using the above menu.

  • Salamanders are an abundant food source in forest ecosystems

    Salamanders are an abundant food source in forest ecosystems In the 1970s, ecologists published results from one of the first whole-forest ecosystem studies ever conducted in Hubbard Brook, New Hampshire. In the paper, scientists reported that salamanders represent one of the largest sources of biomass, or food, of all vertebrates in the forest landscape. Now, using new sampling and statistical techniques not available during the past study, researchers at the University of ...

    Posted at November 28, 2014 | By : | Categories : Ecology | 0 Comment
  • Taking Action to Preserve Native Pollinators

    Taking Action to Preserve Native Pollinators Bees, beetles, flies, birds, wasps, butterflies, moths, bats, and other animals are the key actors in supplying food and providing ecosystem services. Without healthy pollinator populations, our efforts to feed humanity and restore natural landscape function will fail. Our increasing adoption of large scale farming techniques has led to the rapid decline of native pollinators and have put overwhelming pressure on the European honey bee, nearly to their breaking point. ...

    Posted at July 25, 2015 | By : | Categories : Pollinator | 4 Comments
  • In Defense of Invaders, and a rebuttal

    In Defense of Invaders, and a rebuttal (reposted from The Economist) ArcheWild Note: ArcheWild does not agree with the points of view in this article and is drafting a rebuttal for submission to the editors at The Economist Most campaigns against foreign plants and animals are pointless, and some are worse than that Dec 5th 2015 | From the print edition

    Posted at December 8, 2015 | By : | Categories : Ecology | 3 Comments
  • John Le Conte’s 1811 Botanical Survey of Manhattan Island

    John Le Conte's 1811 Botanical Survey of Manhattan Island John Eatton Le Conte, Jr. (sometimes John Eatton LeConte or John Eaton Leconte) (February 22, 1784 – November 21, 1860) was an American naturalist. He was born near Shrewsbury, New Jersey, the son of John Eatton Le Conte and Jane Sloane Le Conte. He graduated from Columbia College, where he showed an ...

    Posted at June 5, 2016 | By : | Categories : Ecology | 1 Comment
  • ArcheWild Builds a 31-acre Butterfly Research Meadow in NJ

    ArcheWild Building a 31-acre Butterfly Research Meadow in NJ ArcheWild has been selected to build a butterfly and pollinator meadow research platform in the New Jersey Highlands for a regional Conservancy.  The meadow's primary function is a Monarch butterfly refuge but is designed to support dozens of additional butterfly and pollinator species. The meadow, built over a 7-year period, uses 100% open-pollinated, local-ecotype OPLE® genetics collected from representative locations throughout the region.

    Posted at February 29, 2016 | By : | Categories : Ecology | 0 Comment
  • Species Spotlight – Eragrostis spectabilis (purple lovegrass)

    Species Spotlight - Eragrostis spectabilis (purple lovegrass) Eragrostis spectabilis (purple lovegrass) is a ubiquitous native grass in the Piedmont, Coastal Plain, and New England physiographic provinces and occurs in at least a few counties for all states east of the Rockies.   Most commonly found in dry, rocky areas or along mown rights of way in full sun and with little competition.  An excellent species for infertile, urban soils where a colorful natural-like aesthetic is desired.  The grass ...

    Posted at June 19, 2016 | By : | Categories : Species Spotlight | 0 Comment
  • Controlled burning may become an accepted and adopted restoration practice

    Controlled burning may become both an accepted and adopted restoration practice Timely and targeted use of fire to reset the ecological clock for a natural landscape area has been a desire for ecologists for many years. Controlled burning can play a critical role in maintaining certain habitats that were previously prone to lightning-initiated fires or were set intentionally by Native Americans to improve hunting grounds. Fire can suppress or kill invasive species, the heat and smoke ...

    Posted at November 28, 2014 | By : | Categories : Ecology | 0 Comment
  • ArcheWild – Springfield Township meadow restoration

    ArcheWild has teamed with the Springfield Township PA Environmental Advisory Council (EAC) to mount a long-term restoration of an original meadow fragment at Peppermint Park.  This 3-acre site is part of a larger 80-acre tract recently acquired from a local family that had only used the field for hay. [caption ...

    Posted at August 4, 2016 | By : | Categories : ArcheWild Services | 0 Comment
  • Plant ‘counts’ as it digests flies

    Plant 'counts' as it digests flies http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-35371349

    Posted at January 25, 2016 | By : | Categories : Ecology | 0 Comment
  • Africa ‘soil crisis threat’ to future

    Africa 'soil crisis threat' to future http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-30277514 Posted from the field by Mark

    Posted at December 4, 2014 | By : | Categories : News | 0 Comment
  • Six Ways Animals use Fake Eyes

    Six Ways Animals use Fake Eyes Eyes can be beautiful. Mysterious. Alluring. They can also be deceptive, no more so than in the animal kingdom, where a range of species display fake eyes on their bodies. Such eyespots, which appear on fish, frogs, butterflies and birds and insects among others, have fascinated natural historians for centuries, and a fresh look at the science of eyespots reveals some modern surprises. #1 - A caterpillar with a snake’s stare Though it’s ...

    Posted at December 2, 2014 | By : | Categories : Ecology | 0 Comment
  • Species Spotlight – Carex appalachica

    Species Spotlight - Carex appalachica Planting groundcover on slopes to reduce mowing and maintenance is a common request of landscape architects and homeowners alike.  Carex appalachica (Appalachian sedge) is a carefree and viable option for this application.  Soil requirements are minimal and tends to prefer medium to poor soils that drain reasonably well, particularly on slopes.  Carex appalachica can form dense mats that exclude nearly all weeds.  Finding intact colonies of Carex appalachica is difficult on ...

    Posted at December 31, 2014 | By : | Categories : Species Spotlight | 0 Comment
  • Three Island Fox Subspecies Now Fully Delisted

    Representing the fastest successful recovery for any Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed mammal in the United States, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) today announced the final de-listing of three subspecies of island fox native to California’s Channel Islands. The removal of the San Miguel, Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz ...

    Posted at August 15, 2016 | By : | Categories : News | 0 Comment
  • Native Seed Germination

    Native Seed Germination Restoration professionals and government agencies are increasingly demanding open-pollinated, local-ecotype (OPLE©) native species when projects are being implemented in natural areas, or where the project is particularly large, to protect the resiliency of surrounding plant and animal communities. NOTE:  Vegetative propagation (not from seed), is a reliable and defensible method for growing straight species when a) there is not enough seed available to grow the required crop, b) the project site is in a ...

    Posted at January 21, 2015 | By : | Categories : Ecology | 6 Comments
  • How to identify Ilex verticillata and Ilex laevigata

    How to identify Ilex verticillata and Ilex laevigata Field guides and websites make differentiation between Ilex verticillata and Ilex laevigata much more difficult than it really is.  Use this handy guide to determine which species you are trying to positively identify. Ilex laevigata Somewhat shiny and medium to light green leaves with blunt tips and blunt teeth on the leaves. Fruit calyx is completely hairless.  Twigs with copious buds and leaf scars. For the botanist: Deciduous shrub to 9 feet ...

    Posted at November 20, 2014 | By : | Categories : Native Plant ID | 2 Comments
  • The Dirty Secret of the Future of Native Plant Gardening

    The Dirty Secret of the Future of Native Plant Gardening I haven't the time to write an in-depth post on this important topic, but I'll paste in a short e-mail Q&A I had today that previews what I'll be writing about.   From: Judith Sent: Friday, January 9, 2015 12:52 PM To: contact@archewild.com Subject: Native Aconitum I am writing a Plant Profile for the Greater Trumbauersville Gardener Magazine on the subject of Aconitum. I am wondering, is there a future for Aconitum uncinatum, ...

    Posted at January 9, 2015 | By : | Categories : Designing with Natives | 0 Comment
  • Tree planting at ‘an all time low’

    Tree planting at 'an all time low' reposted from BBC By Claire Marshall, BBC Environment Correspondent The Woodland Trust says only around a million and a half trees were planted - the target was around 10 million. Official figures released today by the Forestry Commission show that the government is falling far short of its own tree-planting targets. The ...

    Posted at June 18, 2016 | By : | Categories : News | 0 Comment
  • Tookany/Tacony-Frankford Watershed Partnership recognizes ArcheWild

    Tookany/Tacony-Frankford Watershed Partnership recognizes ArcheWild Join the Tookany/Tacony-Frankford Watershed Partnership for its Milestones Award Ceremony & Reception on May 13th at their offices at the Globe Dye Works.  To participate, click here. ArcheWild has contributed financially to the organizations efforts to protect and clean the Tookany/Tacony-Frankford watershed.  The watercourse originates in Abington PA and meanders through several heavily-suburbanized areas before it drains into the Delaware River at the Betsy Ross bridge. ArcheWild also supplies plant material for ...

    Posted at February 8, 2015 | By : | Categories : News | 0 Comment
  • ArcheWild supplies Tookany/Tacony-Frankford Watershed planting

    ArcheWild supplies Tookany/Tacony-Frankford Watershed planting Posted on November 10, 2015 by Julie Almost one hundred volunteers lent a hand to plant a creekside buffer and trees along the Jenkintown Creek at Ethel Jordan Park in Abington’s Elkins Park on Friday and Saturday, November 6 and 7. These 205 native trees ...

    Posted at June 18, 2016 | By : | Categories : ArcheWild Services | 0 Comment
  • Growing Stronger: Toward a Climate-Ready Philadelphia

    Growing Stronger: Toward a Climate-Ready Philadelphia (reposted from Philadelphia government website) Shifts in weather patterns and increasingly frequent extreme storms are challenging communities around the world, including Philadelphia, and inspiring many cities to begin the important work of understanding how climate change will impact municipal assets and operations. The City of Philadelphia is responsible for a broad swath of activities including protecting public safety; enforcing zoning and building standards; supporting improvements in public health; guiding ...

    Posted at December 7, 2015 | By : | Categories : Ecology | 0 Comment
  • Split personality of soil bacteria

    Study unlocks surprising behavior of soil bacteria reposted from BBC By Mark Kinver, Environment reporter, BBC News Different land management systems could alter the behavior of important soil bacteria Newly sequenced genomes of soil bacteria have raised questions about how differing land management affects the organisms' behavior. UK scientists found one strain locked nitrogen in the soil, while another released a potent ...

    Posted at June 18, 2016 | By : | Categories : Ecology | 0 Comment
  • Neonics ‘not equally harmful’ to bees

    Neonics 'not equally harmful' to bees http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-36154134

    Posted at May 1, 2016 | By : | Categories : Ecology,Pollinator | 0 Comment
  • Plan for bee-friendly roads and rail

    Plan for bee-friendly roads and rail http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/29847474 Posted from the field by Mark

    Posted at November 4, 2014 | By : | Categories : Ecology | 0 Comment
  • Species Spotlight – Monarda clinopodia

    Species Spotlight - Monarda clinopodia Today's spotlight is an undescribed Monarda species that keys out to Monarda clinopodia but whose morphology and preferred habitat differ dramatically.  This Monarda  grows in much drier locations, typically on the tops of slopes or embankments and even shale barren areas.  The plant is short, about 12-18" tall, and sports up to three flower heads.  The straight species of Monarda clinopodia grows in moist ditches with loamy soil, grows up to ...

    Posted at December 19, 2014 | By : | Categories : Species Spotlight | 0 Comment
  • Detoxifying Lawns

    ArcheWild was recently contracted to detoxify a lawn after it's improper contamination by one if the new national lawn care services.  The property owner was highly allegergic to the company's chemicals and also experienced several asthma episodes. Our techinicians formulated a detoxifying powder that could be emulsified in water.  The lawn was saturated with the treatment at a rate of 800 gallons per acre.  A truck-mounted tank with agitator ...

    Posted at November 5, 2014 | By : | Categories : ArcheWild Services | 2 Comments
  • ArcheWild Launches Its Ecoregion 064a Seed Farm

    ArcheWild officially started its local ecotype seed farm in November 2014 in Hatfield PA.  This eight-acre parcel will host 100+ native plant species from EcoRegion 064a, which represents the Newark-Philadelphia-Baltimore corridor. About 2 acres of warm season grasses are being grown in rows designed for mechanical harvesting. Another 4 acres will be planted in blocks for hand harvesting.  This seed farm is the first of its kind in that it is being planted using only 100% ...

    Posted at November 29, 2014 | By : | Categories : Ecology,Nursery Production | 2 Comments
  • The 1700 Native Plants of Bucks County PA

    The 1700 Native Plants of Bucks County PA Bucks County, PA is blessed with an enormous range of physiographic regions, soil types, and hydrological conditions.  Habitats range from the Highlands and the diabase areas of Upper Bucks to the coastal plains of Lower Bucks, high palisades of the Delaware River to bog remnants, pristine freshwater ponds to tidal areas. These varied conditions host a dizzying array of species, sub-species, and naturally-occurring varieties. Common species are regularly available from ...

    Posted at January 28, 2016 | By : | Categories : Ecology | 0 Comment
  • ArcheWild plants 25,000 plugs for a forest restoration

    ArcheWild plants 25,000 plugs for a forest restoration ArcheWild supplied the plants and labor for a forest restoration program in New Jersey.  The total number of plantings, to occur over five years is 125,000 plugs as well as a many potted trees/shrubs. The Hurricane Sandy restoration process started with clearing paths to fully access the site, followed by intensive invasive control to allow the plantings to occur on schedule. The ...

    Posted at June 8, 2016 | By : | Categories : ArcheWild Services | 0 Comment
  • Anatomy of an Affordable Residential Bioswale Project

    Bioswales are garden-like features used to effectively handle storm water problems, including helping to prevent erosion.  Bioswales are common features in commercial and park settings, but can be successfully, and affordably, built for the homeowner. The project depicted in this article started with a customer asking for new soil and ...

    Posted at August 16, 2016 | By : | Categories : Designing with Natives | 0 Comment
  • Leaves – The Ultimate Weed Killer

    Leaves - The Ultimate Weed Killer Looking for the best, non-chemical weed killer out there?  Try leaves! Leaving dead leaves in garden beds is often the best technique for keepings weeds away.  Most of our most troublesome weeds are annuals whose seeds require open ground and plenty of sun for them to germinate.  Leaving leaves in the beds covers the ground and prevents access to sunlight for pesky weeds. It can take a couple of years for the ...

    Posted at April 7, 2014 | By : | Categories : Designing with Natives | 3 Comments
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