New ArcheWild 98-Cell Flats: Tiny Plugs that Pack a Punch

This year ArcheWild is shifting some of its efforts to the production of 98-cell flats.  We think these are a great alternative to standard 5″ deep plugs because they are less expensive and easier to install or pot up.  They also root out more quickly than bigger plugs, which means they tend to grow faster and have a better chance of surviving after planting.

Many plants grown out in 98-cell flats are at their optimal size for planting.  Although their stems and foliage will typically be smaller than those of their deep plug 50 counterparts, they display their true leaves and are ready for immediate transplant.  Fresh 98’s will typically still be undergoing their aggressive growth phase, which is why they are often better for planting than some larger, more mature plugs that may have slowed in growth.


We love 98-cell flats because they take less time and space to produce in our greenhouses per plug.  This means we can afford to sell them to our customers for a fraction of what we charge for our standard landscaping plugs.  For this reason, 98’s are a good choice for customers who are on a tight budget, or who simply require a large amount of plugs for a ground cover or large landscaping project.  These plugs can also provide for more creativity when laying out a landscape design, since more available plugs makes for more options.

98s are very viable when used as starter material.  It can be difficult and time consuming to transplant larger plugs or bare roots, but transplanting 98s is as simple as pushing the plug into the topsoil.  The shorter, thinner profile of the plug makes it easy to insert into a container or larger cell without the hassle of back filling.

Potting up Plug 98s:

We suggest planting 98s in the spring for optimal results.  This will ensure they root out before the hot summer months.  Call ArcheWild at (855) 752-6862 or email us at contact@archewild.com for more details.

Species available in 98’s as of 3/13/17:
– Agastache foeniculum – blue giant hyssop
– Bouteloua gracilis – blue grama
– Conoclinium coelestinum – blue mistflower
– Deschampsia cespitosa – tufted hairgrass
– Deschampsia flexuosa var. flexuosa – wavy hairgrass
– Elymus hystrix var. hystrix – eastern bottlebrush grass
– Eragrostis spectabilis – purple lovegrass
– Euthamia graminifolia var. graminifolia – flat-top goldentop
– Leersia virginica – whitegrass
– Monarda fistulosa – wild bergamot
– Solidago stricta – wand goldenrod

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